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Corbridge
Fort, Settlement and Museum

Corbridge, possibly known to the Romans as Coria or Coristopitum, began its existence as a fort. But with the establishment of Hadrian's Wall some miles to the north of it, it was soon turned into an fortified grain distribution point for the garrison along the wall. More so, it also developed into a settlement. A small garrison remained to oversee the grain transports.

Today's site boasts, apart from the excavated remains of the settlement's stone structures, a small museum, displaying the various finds.

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Perhaps most famous of all, the Corbridge Lion. It's among the best examples of Roman statuary found in Britain.

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The famous 'Corbridge Horde', a find of Roman armour pieces and tools which was found buried on the site.

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The far side of the main road, showing the military compounds. Above, looking towards the barracks. On the left you see the main road which ran through the settlement. Below, looking towards the headquarters.
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The remains of one the very large granaries. Note below how the floor was elevated off the ground, so that air could circulate beneath. Given Britain's notoriously damp climate, such measures were need for the grain needed to be kept dry.
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The ruins of a very impressive portico which will have once stood before the granaries. The pillars were definitely of some scale and I would speculate to say that there would not have been many comparable porticos in the province of Britannia. Corbridge must therefore have been a place of some status.

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Above: The foundations of a building believed to have been a little temple. Note the little rounded alcove towards the bottom left corner of the picture. Most likely the place for a statue of a deity.
Below: The end of the aquaeduct which brought water right up to the main road. Behind it, travelling straight away from you (towards where the people are in the distance) are the remains of the aquaeduct itself.
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One warning though to the weary traveller. On many tourist maps Corbridge Fort may seem in the immediate vicinity of the railway station. However, the station lies outside of the picturesque little town itself, a bit to the south. Meanwhile the fort lies a bit to the northwest of Corbridge. So, if coming by train, expect roughly a two mile walk. ;-)

Regards,
The Webmaster

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