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The Roman Empire

The Roman Empire in AD 476
The 'Fall of the Roman Empire'

After the withdrawal of Attila the Hun and the subsequent collapse of the Hun empire, the decline of the western Roman empire continued.
The Visigoths ceased to be federates (allies within the empire) and instead became an independent kingdom, expanding across southern Gaul and across all of Hispania, but for that occupied by the Sueves and the native Basque population in the north.
The hostile Vandals began to dominate the Mediterranean Sea, using their naval supremacy to capture the Balearic Islands as well as Sardinia and Corsica. The hostile Ostrogoths still loomed large in the Balkans.
The fall of the western empire, reduced to little more than Italy itself by now, came about as in AD 476 a senior military officer called Odoacer led the largely German troops of the western Roman army in a revolt against the emperor. However, Odoacer chose to formally rule in the name of the eastern emperor Zeno, Italy therefore formally remaining part of the eastern Roman empire (even though it was in practice an independent kingdom).
However, of the western empire, the area of Dalmatia still remained in independent hands, and even contained an emperor, the deposed emperor Julius Nepos. This area (shown in red) was eventually absorbed into the Ostrogothic kingdom.